Winter Sprucer 2.0: Tasting Notes

As soon as is it humanly possible after the fermentation process is over, bottling begins. There is no harm in leaving the fermented beer inside of your carboy/fermentation vessel for a little while considering that the alcohol generated by the frenzied activity by the yeast post-fermentation now acts as a natural preservative, but the longer one waits to bottle the longer one is going to have to wait in order to sample the finished product. I could hardly wait, and at sometimes I almost, nearly, couldn’t. Walking past all that (hopefully) delicious beer almost everyday and knowing that it wasn’t yet ready to be savored is a tribulation and test of personal endurance that I’m sure every home brewer can relate to. Continue reading “Winter Sprucer 2.0: Tasting Notes”

Achille’s Heal Gruit Ale: Tasting Notes

The completion of this recipe marks the beginning of a new era for me in terms of my gradual evolution as a home brewer;  bit of an eccentric home brewer at that. There are a few different techniques and ingredients featured in Achille’s Heal Gruit ale that I have read extensively about but never put into practice until now. The first major change that was made was my switch from using almost exclusively liquid malt extract (LME) to experimenting with dry malt extract (DME),. I’ve got to say that I welcome this change and will very likely continue to use DME from now on. I find it significantly less messy and you don’t need as much of it because LME contains roughly 10% water and so is slightly less concentrated than the DME which has all of the water removed from it. Furthermore, I made the switch from amber malt to pale malt, although this was made not necessarily out of preference but because I was attempting to replicate a different style in this beer: something with a very light malt profile and much more hop character and bitterness. This, I believe, I most definitely achieved. Continue reading “Achille’s Heal Gruit Ale: Tasting Notes”